Research and Media Network

Bringing people together to improve communication of research findings

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Erythrina indica Lam. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Erythrina indica Lam. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

 

Pankaj Oudhia

 

Introduction

 

Based on Ethnobotanical surveys since year 1990 in different parts of India Pankaj Oudhia has documented vital information about Medicinal Plants mentioned in the famous publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918). Through this research document Pankaj Oudhia has tried to present original document with additional notes. For complete paper with pictures, Interactive Tables, Video and Audio clips please visit pankajoudhia.com

 

 

For original publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918) please visit https://archive.org/details/indianmedicinalp01kirt

 

 

385. Erythrina indica, Linn., h.f.b.l, ii. 188,

Roxb 541.

 

Sans. : — Mandala.

 

Vern- : — Pangra, panjira, furrud (H.) ; Palita mundar vB.) ;

Muruka-marum (Tarn.) ; Modugu. badide-chettu (Tel.); Mooloo-

moorikah, dudup (Mai.) ; Paravalada-mara (Kan,). Birsing

(Kol.) ; Pangara, pbangra, pan. ara (Mar.) ; Panarawes, pararoo

(Guz),

 

Habitat -.— From, tbe foot of tbe Himalayas throughout

India.

 

A deciduous, quick-growing tree, attaining to large size.

Bark tbin, smooth, grey. Outer bark, says Gamble, yellowish,

smooth and shining, peeling off the tbin papery flakes. " Struc-

ture like that of E. suberosa, Roxb," ; says Gamble, further,

" Inner bark, fibrous, wood very soft spongy, white, fibrous

but tough." Young twigs thick set, with small straight, hori-

zontal, broad-based, sharp, black prickles ; leaf-scars conspicu-

ous. Leaves very large, deciduous, rachis 6-1 2in., smooth,

dilated at base, stipules none or very nearly caducous. Leaflets

4-6in., on short swollen stalks, readily disarticulating, roundish-

ovate, acute, glabrous and green on both sides, the terminal one

largest : stipels thick, roundish, persistent. Flowers numerous,

large, generally scarlet, the wings and keel crimson ; on stout

puberulous, peduncles horizontally spreading. Pedicels, about

Jin. long, arranged in 2's or3's, and closely crowded on the upper

half of very stout, rigid, puberulous racemes, 6-12in. long, 2-4

of which diverge horizontally from the summit of the branches.

Calyx (before expansion of flowers) tubular, If in., covered with

deciduous tomentum, upper segment subulate, sharp but not

rigid, two lateral similar but smaller lowest, one longer doubled

over the rest to form blunt point to the bud, soon splitting along

the back (between the upper teeth) to the base, and the whole

curved down like a spathe-standard, nearly 3in. Wings less

than lin. Keel-petal fin. Stamens much exserted and project-

ing in front of flowers, 2fin. Pod 5-6in., cylindric, torulose,

beak sharp, curved, about lin. long. Seed, 3-8, beanlike, about

lin. long, chocolate coloured, dull, shining.

 

 

 

440 INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS.

 

Very common in the Concan and North Kanara.

I have seen a white-flowered variety, and a deep scarlet one in

the Thana Forests (K. R. K.) A variety, with pink flowers, is

noted by Moon, says Trim en.

 

Parts used : — The bark, juice and leaves. [Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: All parts are used as medicine.]

 

Uses : — The bark is used medicinally as a febrifuge and

antibilious (Watt).

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OeqbuiK0fek" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/rONHh53sbG0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

In the Concan, the juice of the young leaves is used to kill

worms in sores, and the young roots of the white-flowered

variety are pounded and given with cold milk as an aphro-

disiac (Dymock).

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bC3xu9aV5ug" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

It is anthelmintic and useful as a collyrium in ophthalmia.

The leaves are applied externally to disperse venereal buboes

and to relieve pain of the joints (Kanai Lai Dey).

 

[Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: Through Ethnobotanical surveys in different parts of India I have documented information about over 55,000 Traditional Herbal Formulations in which Erythrina plant parts are used as important ingredient. Among the Traditional Healers of Odisha and Chhattisgarh use of Allelopathically enriched Erythrina root is very popular. They use it in over 15,000 Traditional Herbal Formulations as Tertiary Ingredient. These Formulations are used in treatment of different types of cancer. As nonary ingredient it is added in 8000 Traditional Herbal Formulations used in treatment of Sickle Cell Anemia. The Healers of Andhra Pradesh, Odisha and Jharkhand use it in over 9000 Traditional Herbal Formulations as septenary ingredient. These Formulations are used both internally as well as externally in treatment of joint related diseases. Please see Table Erythrin-1 to 55 for details.]

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bR_EInbf1e4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/b5jHRa88eWg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DY0wSsdAwIM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

The fresh juice of the leaves is used as an injection into

the ear for the relief of ear-ache, and as an anodyne in toothache

(Dr. Thornton, in Watt's Dictionary).

 

E-documents on Erythrina

 

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleList&Author=oudhia&...

 

Citation

 

Oudhia, Pankaj (2013). Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Erythrina indica Lam. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)]. www.pankajoudhia.com

Views: 37

Add a Comment

You need to be a member of Research and Media Network to add comments!

Join Research and Media Network

Badge

Loading…

© 2019   Created by Matthew Wright.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service