Research and Media Network

Bringing people together to improve communication of research findings

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

 

Pankaj Oudhia

 

Introduction

 

Based on Ethnobotanical surveys since year 1990 in different parts of India Pankaj Oudhia has documented vital information about Medicinal Plants mentioned in the famous publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918). Through this research document Pankaj Oudhia has tried to present original document with additional notes. For complete paper with pictures, Interactive Tables, Video and Audio clips please visit pankajoudhia.com

 

 

For original publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918) please visit https://archive.org/details/indianmedicinalp01kirt

 

 

 

653. Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass. e.f.b.l, hi. 308.

Syn. : — Yerbesina sativa, Roxb. 606.

 

Habitat : — A native of Tropical Africa, cultivated in various

parts of India.

 

Vern. :— Ramtil ; Kalatil (H. B. and Bomb.) ; Valesulu f Tel) ;

Karmadoo (Mysore).

 

A stout, erect annual, smooth or scabrid, pubescent upwards.

Leaves 3-oin., sessile, half-amplexicaul, linear, ovate-lanceolate,

lanceolate-oblong, or subcordate, serrate, obtuse. Heads i-lin.

diam., peduncles naked, l-2in. Involucral bracts 5 ; outer

broadly elliptic or ovate, obtuse, green ; ligules few, broad.

 

Achenes dorsally pressed, glabrous, tip rounded, yielding a

bland oil.

 

Use : — The oil is sweet, and may be used for the same

pharmaceutical purposes as sesamum oil (Dymock).

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BiC5JBSCUIY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5m9uZ3DJiM8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

The achenes contain from 40 to 45 per cent, of a yellow sweet oil. According

to Leather seeds from cultivated Indian plants yield on an average 40 per cent,

of oil. The oil is used in soap-making and as a substitute for Linseed oil ;

in India it is occasionally employed as a substitute for ghee.

[Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: As Adivasi Medicine it is important ingredient of hundreds of Traditional Herbal Formulations. Unfortunately not much work has been done on its different aspects by modern researchers. I have documented Traditional Knowledge about this species. Please see Table Guizo-1 to Guizo-115 for exhaustive information on this species.]

 

Crossley and Le Sueur in 1898 examined four samples of East Indian oil :

Specific gravity at 15*5°, 9248—0*9263 ; solidifies below zero ; saponification

value, 1889— 192*2; iodine value, 1266 — 1338 i Reichert-Meissl value, O'll—

0*63; Maumene test, 81° ; butyro refractometer, 63° at 40°. Fatty scids and

unsapomfiable, per cent. 94*11 ; iodine value, 1475. The oil has slight siccative

powers and gained 7*2 per cent, in weight in fifteen days.

 

E-documents on Guizotia

 

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleList&Author=oudhia&...

 

Citation

 

Oudhia, Pankaj (2013). Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)]. www.pankajoudhia.com

 

Views: 13

Add a Comment

You need to be a member of Research and Media Network to add comments!

Join Research and Media Network

Badge

Loading…

© 2019   Created by Matthew Wright.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service