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Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Leea macrophylla Roxb. ex Hornem. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Leea macrophylla Roxb. ex Hornem. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

 

Pankaj Oudhia

 

Introduction

 

Based on Ethnobotanical surveys since year 1990 in different parts of India Pankaj Oudhia has documented vital information about Medicinal Plants mentioned in the famous publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918). Through this research document Pankaj Oudhia has tried to present original document with additional notes. For complete paper with pictures, Interactive Tables, Video and Audio clips please visit pankajoudhia.com

 

 

For original publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918) please visit https://archive.org/details/indianmedicinalp01kirt

 

 

 

305. Leea macrophylla, Roxb. h.f.b.l, i. 664,

Roxb. 291.

 

Sans. : — Samoodraka.

 

Vern. — Dhol-shumoodra (B.) ; Dinda (Bomb.) ; Samudraca

(H.) ; Hatkan ( Santal) ; Dinda (Mar.).

 

Habitat :— Throughout the hotter parts of India, from the

tropical Himalaya, as far west as Kumaon, to Bengal, Assam,

and the Western Peninsula.

 

Stems erect, flexuose. Leaves simple, 9in., 2-fid, broadly

ovate, sub-cordate at base, coarsely serrate or dentate or sub-

lobed, repand, glabrous and dark green above, nearly white

beneath, and pubescent, with minute-branching hairs. Cymes

puberulous, 1-ft. or more, freely-branching. Flowers white,

small. Fruit the size of a small cherry, smooth, black,

succulent.

 

Part used : — The root. [Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: All parts are used as medicine.]

 

Uses : — The tuberous root is employed in the cure of gui-

nea-worm, and when pounded is applied to obstinate sores to pro-

mote cicatrization. According to Roxburgh, the root is astrin-

gent and a reputed remedy for ringworm (Dymock).

 

The root is said to yield colour for dyeing.

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BFE7TJoKZXE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xEjiK31o8As" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

E-documents on Leea

 

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleList&Author=oudhia&...

 

 

K. 0. AMPELID/E. 351

 

In Chhota Nagpur, it is supposed to have anodyne proper-

ties, being applied externally to allay pain (Revd. A. Camp-

bell).

 

The Burmans use the root as an application to wounds to

stop the effusion of blood (Mason).

 

[Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: Through Ethnobtanical surveys I have collected information about over 25,000 Traditional Herbal Formulations in which Leea parts are used both internnaly as well as externally. These Formulations are used in treatment of over 30 common as well as complicated diseases. It is really surprising that young researchers are not taking much interest in this sepcies. There are hundreds of Formulations waiting for validation under frame of modern science. The uses of Leea in treatment of different types of cancer with Indigenous Medicinal Rice and also with tens of wild insect species in Traditional Entomotherapy are unique Traditional Medicinal Knowledge waiting for further research. Please Table Leea-1 to Leea-18 for details about Herbal Formulations.

 

Citation

 

Oudhia, Pankaj (2013). Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Leea macrophylla Roxb. ex Hornem. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)]. www.pankajoudhia.com

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