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Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Spondias pinnata (L. f.) Kurz [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Spondias pinnata (L. f.) Kurz [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

 

Pankaj Oudhia

 

Introduction

 

Based on Ethnobotanical surveys since year 1990 in different parts of India Pankaj Oudhia has documented vital information about Medicinal Plants mentioned in the famous publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918). Through this research document Pankaj Oudhia has tried to present original document with additional notes. For complete paper with pictures, Interactive Tables, Video and Audio clips please visit pankajoudhia.com

 

 

For original publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918) please visit https://archive.org/details/indianmedicinalp01kirt

 

 

331. Spondias mangifera, Willd, h.f.b.i., ii. 42,

Roxb. 387.

 

Sans.- Amrataka.

 

Vers. — Darakhte-moryam.

 

Vern. — Amra, amara, ambodha (H.) ; Amra (B.; ; Tangrong

(Garo.) ; Katmaa (Tarn.); Aravi mamadi (Tel.); Jangli am, am-

bada (Bomb.) ; Amra, amara, ambodha, ambra (Hind.) ; Amra,

 

ambra (Beng.) ; Amburri (Kol.) ; Amara (Assam) ; Tongrong ;

50

 

 

 

394 INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS.

 

adiai (Garo.) ; Amara (Nepal) ; Kouchiling (Lepcha) ; Kat, Am-

boham (Mai. S. P.) ; Ambuda (Uriya) ; Ambera (Kurku) ; Hamara

(Coond) ; Amra, amurs, bohamle, amara, araabara (Kumaon),

(Bahamo) ; Ambara (P. B.) ; Ran-amb, jungli am (Deccan) ;

Ambada, jangli-am, ambada, amra amarab, (Bomb.) ; Ro amba,

ambada (Mar.) ; Kat-maa, rhanamb, mariman, cbedi, katmora,

Ampullai (Tarn.) ; Puiille, kaders ambala chettupita, briksb,

amnivuru, mamidi, amatum, adivio-mamadie toura mamidi

(Tel.) ; Amte, ambatte mara, amate, pundi (Kan). Corre, kyoroe

(Burm) ; .ZEmbcreella (Sing,); Darakhte-moryam (Pers.).

 

Habitat. — Throughout India, from the Indus eastwards and

southwards to Molacca and Ceylon.

 

A large, glabrous, deciduous tree. Bark smooth, aromatic

grey, with short shallow, longitudinal wrinkles. Wood soft,

light grey. Leaves 1-1-J ft. ; petiole slender. Leaflets 3-5 pair,

quite entire, elliptic-oblong, acuminate 2-9 by 1-4 in., shortly

petiolulate, shining, more or less oblique ; secondary nerves

nearly straight, 10-20 pair, joined at the ends by a prominent

nerve, running along and close to the edge of the leaf-blade.

Flowers pentamerous, white, nearly sessile, clustered on stout

ramifications of a sparingly-branched, terminal panicle, poly-

gamous, nearly sessile. Calyx 5-toothed, deciduous. Petals

5, about t 1 ^ in. long, oblong, greenish white, spreading. Disk

cupular, crenate. Stamens 10, inserted below the disk ;

filaments subulate, shorter than the petals ; anthers versatile.

Ovary sessile, free. Carpels 4-5 distinct in flower, coalescing

into a single stone in the carpels. Drupe lJ-2 in. long, ovoid or

oblong, fleshy, smooth, acid and rose- scented, yellow when

lipe. Putamen fibrous and filled with cavities outside. Seeds

2-5, of which only one is perfect.

 

Parts used. — The fruit, bark, leaves and gum. [Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: All parts are used as medicine.]

 

Use. — The pulp of the fruit is acid and astringent, and is

considered useful in bilious dyspepsia (Dymock). The bark is

sometimes used as a refrigerant medicine (T. N. Mukerji).

It is also useful in dysentery ; and the juice of the leaves is

used for ear-ache (Atkinson).

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/mzXIqoIs_XA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/KWjeAQx0N0k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

 

 

N. 0. CORIARLE. 395

 

The fruit is an useful antiscorbutic. The gum, in the form

of mucilage, is a useful adjunct to other medicines for the pur-

pose of suspending heavy powders, etc. The pulp, when boiled,

has a faint rosy smell.

 

[Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: Spondias roots are added as octonart ingredient in over 10000 Traditional Herbal Formulations, Leaves are added in over 6000 Traditional Herbal Formulations as Secondary ingredient, Bark is added in over 7000 Traditional Herbal Formulations as Nonary ingredients, Fruits are added in over 7000 Traditional Herbal Formulations as Tertiary ingredient. I have documented much information about medicinal uses of this species. Many Indian research organisations are working to validate these Traditional Formulations. Please see Tables Spond-1 to Spond-100 for details.]

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Mov9gJhMU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

E-documents on Spondias

 

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleList&Author=oudhia&...

 

 

 

Citation

 

Oudhia, Pankaj (2013). Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Spondias pinnata (L. f.) Kurz [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)]. www.pankajoudhia.com

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