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Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Trigonella foenum-graecum L. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Trigonella foenum-graecum L. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)].

 

Pankaj Oudhia

 

Introduction

 

Based on Ethnobotanical surveys since year 1990 in different parts of India Pankaj Oudhia has documented vital information about Medicinal Plants mentioned in the famous publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918). Through this research document Pankaj Oudhia has tried to present original document with additional notes. For complete paper with pictures, Interactive Tables, Video and Audio clips please visit pankajoudhia.com

 

 

For original publication by Kirtikar and Basu (1918) please visit https://archive.org/details/indianmedicinalp01kirt

 

 

 

346. T. Foenum-graecum, Linn, h.f.b.i,, ii. 87,

 

Roxb; 588

 

Sans. :— Methi.

Arab. : — Hulbah.

Vers. : — Shamlit.

 

 

 

N. 0. LEGUMIN0S.E. 405

 

Vern. :— Methi(B. and H.) ; Vendayam (Tarn.); Mentulu

(Tel.); Menthya(Kan.j.

 

Habitat : —Cultivated in many parts of India, but is wild in

Kashmir and the Punjab.

 

Annual, robust, erect, sub-glabrous herbs. Stipules not la-

ciniate. Leaflets toothed, f-1 in. long, oblanceolate oblong.

Flowers 1-2, sessile in the axils of the leaves. Calyx \-\ in.,

teeth linear. Corolla much exserted. Pod 2-3in. long, turgid,

10-20-seeded, with a long, persistent beak, often falcate.

 

Use : — Fenugreek seeds are considered carminative, tonic,

and aphrodisiac. Several confections made with this article

are recommended for use in dyspepsia with loss of appetite,

in the diarrhoea of puerperal women, and in rheumatism

{Hindu Mat. Med.) An infusion of the seeds is given by the

Natives to small-pox patients as a cooling drink. Mahomedan

writers describe the plant and seeds as hot and dry, suppurative,

aperient, diuretic, emmenagogue, useful in dropsy, chronic

cough, and enlargements of the spleen and liver. A poultice

of the leaves is said to be of use in external and internal

swellings and burns, and to prevent the hair falling off. The

flour of the seeds is used as a poultice, and is applied to the

skin in cosmetic (Dymock). The use of fenugreek as a medi-

cinal agent is now obsolete in Europe and the United States.

Formerly the seeds were employed in the preparation of emol-

lient cataplasms, fomentations and enemata, but were never

given internally. The powdered seeds are still used in veteri-

nary practice (Bentley and Trimeri).

 

[Pankaj Oudhia’s Comment: Methi is popular Traditional Medicine in India. Through Ethnobotancial surveys conducted in different parts of India I have documented information about 15 Lacs Traditional Herbal Formulations in which different parts of Methi are used as primary, secondary, tertiary, senary etc. ingredients. The Traditional Healers of young generation are still experiemnting with Methi and they are not only improving the old Formulations but also developing new Formulations in order to fight modern diseases. They are experimenting with new herbs including exotic species and preparing new Formulations. I have documented 200 days Methi based treatment of 10,000 cases of Type 2 Diabetes. The work is still in prgress with the expert Healers. In India the Traditional Healers practice Traditional Allelopathic Knowledge in order to enrich Methi with desired medicinal properties. I have documnted this unique Traditional Knowledge and developed Vedic Farming methods for Methi farming with the help of innovative farmers and herb growers.

 

The Ethnobotanical surveys conducted in Odisha revelaed that the Healers are aware of use of Methi roots in the state. There are 10,000 Traditional Herbal Formulations in which Methi roots are used as nonary ingredient. Please see Tables Meth-1 to Methi-1500 for exhaustive information about Methi based Formulations documented, so far.]  

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/farqv-dAAmg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XuVEN4jHJ5Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/GkG9g23VzKg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

The seeds being toasted and afterwards infused are used

 

by Native practitioners in Southern India for dysentery

 

(Ainslie.) In the Concan, the leaves are used both externally

 

and internally, on account of their cooling properties (Dymock).

 

Fenugreek.

 

Analysis of 2 samples gave the following results :—

 

Nitrogenous matter ... ... 13*74 and 1302 p. c.

 

Fat ... ... ... ... 3*31 and 3-54 „

 

Crude fibre .,. ... ... 3175 and 29*36 „

 

Nitrogen-free extract ... ... 45*79 and 48*14 . „

 

Ash ... ... ... ... 5*42 and 5*94 „ in the

 

dry matter.

 

 

 

406 INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS.

 

The pure ash contained (per cent.)

 

 

 

K 2

 

 

Na 2 CaO

 

 

MgO

 

 

Fe 2 3

 

 

PA

 

 

1. 19-37

 

 

7-60 3073

 

 

119

 

 

4*71

 

 

8-24

 

 

2. 18'85

 

 

7*55 28-92

 

 

0-96

 

 

5-08

 

 

7-87

 

 

S0 3

 

 

Si0 2

 

 

CI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. 4*35

 

 

21'97

 

 

123

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. 3-91

 

 

25-19

 

 

0-99.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In composition,

 

 

fenugreek resembles

 

 

Trifolium incamatm

 

 

 

LXXVIII. pt. II. 1900, p. 364.

 

Tr'igonella Foenumgrcecum.

 

The crushed seeds yield only 0-14 per cent, of a light brown, neutral,

volatile oil, possessing the distinct odour of the seeds. It has the sp.gr. 0'870

at 13-5° and [a]o =4-8°. It is readily soluble in absolute and 90 per cent,

alcohol , but its solubility in 80 per cent, alcohol is only 1 : 460.— J. S. Ch. I.,

April 15, 1903, p. 439.

 

E-documents on Trigonella

 

 

http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=earticleList&Author=oudhia&...

 

 

Citation

 

Oudhia, Pankaj (2013). Pankaj Oudhia’s Notes on Trigonella foenum-graecum L. [Kirtikar, Kanhoba Ranchoddas, and Baman Das Basu. "Indian Medicinal Plants." Indian Medicinal Plants. (1918)]. www.pankajoudhia.com

 

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